What’s It All About Al-Friday – Employing People Who Won’t Screw Up Expensive Equipment (i.e. the first transatlantic telegraph cable)

You know – what’s it all about Alfie?
Why do we do what we do? Why do we go to work? Why do we practice HR?
Lots of important questions to answer on Fridays, as a reminder at the end of the traditional work week of why we are working, and what our life is really all about, before entering the weekend.
This Friday, it’s all about having the right people, in the right place, at the right time, with the right skills. That’s what HR is about. That’s why we do what we do. Strip away the crap – and get back to basics. We recruit, pay, incentivize, develop, reward, coach – you name it – so that the job gets done.

A lovely example of what happens when HR is non-existent, or goes horribly wrong, is embodied in one of the grandest staff fuck-ups of all time.

The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable laid in 1858 was an incredible feat of vision and hard yakka. So everyone was anxious for it to have the best chance possible as a successful business product.


The dude was a surgeon and ate a looooooot of FIG JAM (fuck I’m good, just ask me). His scientific curiosity somehow made him qualified to be an electrician, and responsible for running one side of the cable. Don’t know how he got that position, but when he got there, he screwed it up big time. By putting too high a voltage through, the cable was shot, and the project was a failure when the cable no longer was able to send messages.

Today’s recounts may not be entirely accurate, so of course there may have been many other factors to the failure. However a large part of the blame is laid upon the Wildman. He rode it hard, he rode it fast, he rode it to hell – cos he’s a Wildman baby, ain’t no one who can tell him what to do, or he gonna cut you with the skill of a surgeon!

Anywayyyyy… End of another week. Job well done. Nice to know HR is a very important part of making  sure incredibly expensive equipment isn’t destroyed. Good on you – now enjoy that weekend!
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Baby You’re a Firework

Of Flu.

Yes, I am was a human firework of flu. Enjoy that visual while you can. Mmm, I am reeking of professionalism right now.

So please excuse the lack of updating round these traps. Back on it tomorrow, pinkie promise.

Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Movers, Shakers & Monday Game Changers – Bob Dylan Electrified

The day we look at movers, shakers and game changers, of things that look incredibly trivial now… 

Because scaremongers like to write a lot about the insane changes the next generation will bring. Here’s some changes already brought, against all odds and discouragement, and they turned out alright. 

By 1965 Bob Dylan was the ‘voice of a generation’.

I really like his song Like a Rolling Stone, and it was one of the first songs he would perform with an electronic, rather than an acoustic, sound.

So you would think that as a ‘voice of a generation’, he would have been supported and loved by his fellow aged fans.
But no, his new electric sound was so offensive (and perhaps poorly executed) that he was labelled ‘Judas’ by a vocal audience member.
It would be crazy to imagine the biggest stars of today being called Judas for using electronic instruments, hell most of the biggest pop stars are lip syncing at a concert where a ticket is 100 bucks a pop.

Bob was a true mover, shaker and game changer, for the music scene of yesterday’s youth, that was just as scary as the possible change of today. Apparently in this case, it was equally as scary for all generations involved. And it all turned out alright. Electric instruments haven’t killed folk music yet.

Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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What’s It All About Al-Friday – Work & Play

You know – what’s it all about Alfie?
Why do we do what we do? Why do we go to work? Why do we practice HR?
Lots of important questions to answer on Fridays, as a reminder at the end of the traditional work week of why we are working, and what our life is really all about, before entering the weekend.

“When he worked, he really worked. But when he played, he really PLAYED.” 

-Dr Seuss 

Congrats my amigos, we made it to the end of the traditional work week! Have you worked hard? Of course! Do you have more hard worked planned for the weekend? Grocery shopping, laundry washing, cleaning and plenty of other tasks do to with living, I’m sure.
I really hope we all get time to really play during our time off too, and not just what us adults call play. I hope we have the discipline to make time to really play, laugh at silliness, and see the world through happy innocence. I hope we can be refreshed, and remember the wonder of great love, discovery and true care for others.
It’s all about meeting the necessities, and play is one of them, right?
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Channel The Serenity & Explain It Again: HR Terminology

Ahhh the serenity. Channel the serenity. Breathe the serenity. Be the serenity.

And now for the 100,000,000th time, explain the difference between permanent, full time, fixed term, casual, and part time.

These words describe the length of a contract:
Permanent – Usually means no end date on the contract, i.e. the employee is employed until they reach retirement age or the employment is terminated for some other reason.

Fixed term – The contract is only for a certain period, which is agreed to at the start. Perhaps the contract will be renewed, perhaps not. There is no guarantee of employment afterwards.

These words describe the type of contract:

Normal – Ok, so you wouldn’t be talking about a ‘normal’ contract, or ‘normal employee’ per se, but this is what an employee is if they aren’t casual. They are normal. They get all the benefits of being an employee at the organisation.

Casual – Usually a short term contract, but there are no benefits granted that a normal employee would receive (i.e. leave, medical insurance, public holidays, bonuses). You work, you get paid, you don’t work, you don’t get paid. Perhaps the wage includes some compensation for the benefits you don’t receive.

These words describe the hours worked:
Full Time – A full work week. In Australia this usually means a 37.5 hour work week (5 x 7.5 hr days).

Part Time – A number of hours that don’t tally up to the normal work week’s total.

May the serenity be with you, when you are facilitating a round of recruitment, or new starter’s contract, and yet another person can’t quite tell you what they want or need. And I hope you’re able to take the opportunity to use a really simple issue like HR terminology, to show your expertise and capability in your field, and gain their respect as you empower them to speak the lingo. Your patience and approachability with such a basic thing, will be really appreciated.

Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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