Weed

It’s spring, and although everything is green, I was surprised that when I actually looked at the garden, a huge amount of weeds have sprung up.
It was a good reminder that in times of growth, we have to be really on guard about what’s establishing in our lives.
Are you learning – pushing yourself – getting out of your comfort zone?  
Or are you being challenged – feeling stretched – making lots of tough calls?

Whether it’s growth you’re choosing, or that’s being imposed on you, while you are concentrating on everything else, just take a moment to look at what’s established during these times … your sleep habits, eating habits, stress relief… Is there some weeding to do?
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Forgiving yourself for your full time job

How amazing are biological rhythms that we just accept, like REM cycles, tides, moons, seasons – flowers that open and close at certain hours of the day. We say “yes of course, these things should have this rhythm because they are from nature and part of nature and are participating in the natural order of things.” But when it comes to ourselves, we forget we are from nature, we forget we are part of nature, we forget we are in a natural order of things. We must compete and fight and find glory and excellence in ourselves. We think we tap into our wild side, all the while forgetting what the wild is really like. A plant doesn’t strangle another plant for its own glory, it has no concept or interest in glory, it merely does so for survival. It is fulfilling the purpose of being that one particular plant. So why fight and work tirelessly to seek out things we neither need for survival or fulfilment of our purpose?
I’ll tell you why – because we hear about things like portfolio careers, and see the current dotcom boom as websites are snapped up for $1 Billion Dollars, and are people who have weathered recessions and GFCs and terrorism and wars on terrorism, and have seen the hard work of our qualifications melt into the new status quo, and can wake up and read the news, celebrity gossip and see our vain friend’s selfies all before 8am. The competition, the fear, the intensity, it’s all right there – a relentless beating of the drum. We keep getting told over and over that our purpose is not enough, that we need to aim higher, be harder, better, faster, stronger. ‘All’ isn’t the job and the family, having it ‘all’ is the job, the family, the blog, the daily jogs, AND the adorable dog.
I dunno, this is just a really long winded way of me saying, if you work a full time job, go easy on yourself that you’re not also writing a book and running a blog and living in a hospital-grade-clean house and having a fabulous social life to publish on Facebook. It’s ok to just do the simple things like surviving and fulfilling the purpose of being you. And survival doesn’t have to mean that whole bullshit happy clappy business perk up of ‘don’t just survive, thrive’ – it can also mean the very basics of being a human being – working for a roof over your head, food on your table, being with people you love and using your natural gifts for good. I have never looked at a plant that has survived an Adelaide summer and thought, “if only it had pushed itself harder.” I don’t know why I keep looking in the mirror and saying the same thing to myself.  
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Networking as a Guy-Friend Girl

A guy-friend girl could basically be summed up in two words: Sarah Miller. I served my time with the female population at a single-gender high school, and while I love my lady friends, there really is nothing so pleasant as a great bloke friend. This is basically what my bloke friendships entail: beer, and banter. This is why I love them so much, because my diarrhoea mouth that runs on sarcasm generally leads to pissed off lady friends, but is just taken as face value crap by dudes. That rocks my socks. And my lady friends who get me are the absolute loves of my life, because they’re smart self-assured diamonds in the rough.
It’s not so great for networking though. It’s especially not so great for work situations, like those where the women gather to discuss children, relationships and specific to Singapore, managing their maids. Pass me a beer and point me to the closest bloke please.
But then comes that awkward moment when you approach a few men to join their conversation, and they graciously allow you to join, with the most uneasy look on their face. They’re so uneasy in fact, you can tell this is the face they used when they introduced their brother to their brand new mother-in-law, and the brother happened to be Bernard Black from Black Books.
 

Honestly, I don’t know if it will ever get better for me. LIke does there get a point where I’m unattractive enough that I can be straight but accepted like some asexual unicorn with absolutely no threat potential whatsoever? I will have to re-assess this in 20 years time. I do honestly wish I could be in the boys club though. Y’all get to talk about such interesting things, keep each other to a code of decency, and party hard without constantly assessing each other’s reputation – I want to go to there.
Don’t worry though. Despite the awkwardness and raised eyebrows, I still say screw it and speak to whoever I like. And Lord help me if I have to speak about one more diet and exercise regime while waiting to make my move to the other side of the room. For the record, small chat topics I will indulge in include: tv, movies, tv, celebrity dirt, Youtube viral videos, annoying people on Facebook, stand up comedy, real politics, and cooking. Small chat topics that turn me into Ron Swanson from Parks and Recration include: weight, domestic duties, shopping, celebrity PR, tabloid politics, and anything approving about pop music that’s not ironic (in the hipster sense of irony).
On a momentarily serious note though, this whole crap vibe of ‘appropriateness’ of women speaking to men is yet another reason that the glass ceiling is continuing to break birds’ necks.
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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My Latest Near Death Experience

It is so good to be back here blogging with you!
I have just had a fabulous week in Australia that exceeded every expectation of awesomeness. Family, weddings, food, cocktails, dancing and laughs – the good life was being force fed to me and all I could say was “get in ma belly!”
Although, as the title suggests, I nearly experienced death. Not like real life death, but an online death. I had no fibre optic cable internet and 3G. By the grace of a higher power though, I got through. I have come back incredibly refreshed after having a real break from everything. My mobile phone had no global roaming. The folks’ internet was so slow I quit trying to use it within the first couple of days. And then I started just getting by without it. Of course, I still had the deep desire to google and wikipedia everything, but life somehow functions without the net. Who would have thunk it? I’m not sure I quite believe that I could really live without the internet on a regular basis, as I do heartily subscribe to the modern Maslow’s theory.
Oh and I could totally be best friends with Tom from Parks & Recreation.
However, I must also say it was a good for the soul to get offline. Try it sometime. In fact, have you got your next holiday booked? It’s not going to just book itself! Pick a week, set a budget, pick a place. If you’re not fully utilising your recreation leave days every year, you are missing out on so much. Say you work for 50 years (18-68 years old, sounds about right for the modern day), and you have 20 recreation leave days available to you per year, you end up having 1000 recreation leave days available to you in your career. With 260 working days in a year (thereabouts), that’s 2.8 years on recreation leave. Really you will be working 47.2 years and taking the other 2.8 years off. For every recreation leave day you don’t get around to taking, losing or getting cashed out, you’re losing those precious 2.8 years out of your life time career to experience life. Doesn’t that number freak you out? Out of your whole 50 year career, you’d have 2.8 years off in it. Makes me want to go and book every last day available to me now, just to make sure circumstances don’t rob me of those 2.8 years I will be able to spend away from work between the ages of 18 and 68. What a precious commodity we so easily never get around to using.
I’m looking forward to sinking my teeth into blogging after this break, and can’t wait to enjoy your online company again. The HR blogging community is just a top bunch of people and I’m so glad to be back!
Now onto booking my next holiday… Any destination suggestions?
Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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Czarina of HR – Leading Ladies Series

Janine Truitt, the @CzarinaofHR, asked me to write a post as part of her leading ladies series.

How could I say no?!

Check it out here – wasn’t I the luckiest duck getting to wish her happy birthday on The day?!

Cheers,
Sarah
Btw, if you’re wondering how I can be employed in HR, and write about HR – here‘s my explanation.

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